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Tolling Coalition

Tolling Coalition

Welcome to the site of the U.S. Tolling Coalition!

We are transportation supporters from throughout the United States organized around the goal of convincing Congress to repeal the prohibition on tolling existing Interstate highways.

Allowing states increased use of tolling represents a long-term, sustainable source of revenue to address the significant backlog of system reconstruction needs. Coalition members lobbied the 112th Congress to ensure that MAP-21 created new opportunities for transportation investment through tolling, as elected officials at all levels of government are challenged by traditional methods of project financing.

The U.S. Tolling Coalition is continuing its efforts in the 114th Congress to lift the federal ban on tolling the Interstate Highway System.

This site is intended to promote Interstate tolling as the Administration and Congress prepare for the reauthorization of MAP-21 in 2015.

Enjoy a safe trip on US roads

Road tripping across the US is every driver’s dream. The long stretching roads that connect the coasts and pass through so many different landscapes are enough to make any traveler drool at the simple thought of driving across the North American continent. However, a heavenly experience can soon turn into a nightmare if you do not take the necessary precautions before such a lengthy trip. These include paying the road tolls, having a well-equipped car, food and water supply and, of course, medicine. The latter is crucial and your medical kit should contain pills for every medical condition you have. For example, if you are suffering from hypothyroidism, then you must have some Thyromine with you. This natural supplement is your perfect road trip partner and it will keep you healthy all through your journey.

US roads are not as safe as they used to be

The majority of the freeways in America have been built over 70 years ago. While the roads near the big cities have been constantly improved, some of the isolated ones have not seen construction workers around for more than half a century. For this reason, you have to research in advance any roads you plan to travel on and even consider some alternative routes. Along the way you might find yourself stranded in the middle of nowhere by a damaged portion of a freeway, or a road that has been only half-built. To keep your calm and focus during stressful moments such as this, you must have a healthy thyroid gland that regulates your blood flow and prevents you from hyperventilating and panicking. You can ensure that by taking Thyromine on a daily basis before, during and after your trip is completed.

Some roads have not been used for years and left abandoned in a state of utter decay. From afar, the whole freeway framework looks like the circulatory system of an adult person, where some blood vessels and glands have ceased to work because of improper treatment. Very often, people ignore important organs in their body like the thyroid gland, which is responsive for the proper transport of hormones. Without the use of a powerful supplement like Thyromine, this gland stops functioning and very soon you gain weight and catch illnesses, just like untraveled roads gather weeds, holes and debris.

If you’re not healthy, you will not have a safe trip

Traveling through the US is a memorable experience that cannot be compared to anything else. You get to see amazing landscapes adorned by mountains, canyons, lakes and deep forests. You also get to visit many towns and meet people from the smallest communities and all the way to the large cities. However, if you are not well before or during this trip, the whole journey will be an aching nightmare.

This is why you must have a constant intake of vitamins, enzymes and proteins that will keep your health at the highest possible level. You can easily obtain all of these simply by using Thyromine, a remedy obtained only from natural extracts like Ginger and Guggal Tree that provide your thyroid gland with the right incentives to help you avoid the stress and fatigue that are usually associated with long trips.

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What’s New?

What’s New?

The federal government paid up to 90% of the cost to build the original Interstate system, a key reason for the present-day limits on Interstate tolling. However, that initial investment has long since elapsed and states face a much higher price tag in reconstructing the system with the federal government as a smaller partner.

The North Carolina Department of Transportation is proposing to toll I-95 within its borders to pay for road improvements and lane additions. The cost of rehabilitating existing lanes and widening is estimated to be about $4.4 billion, but current funding can cover only about 10 percent. So NCDOT is seeking permission to toll the interstate from the Federal Highway Administration.

The House and Senate will be taking up their respective Transportation Authorization Bills beginning Wednesday, Feb. 15.   Floor amendments and debate in both Houses are expected to continue through Friday, Feb. 17.Several amendments have been filed which, if enacted, could discourage any state from considering tolls as a means to pay for highway construction or rehabilitation.

Amendment 223 by Rep Michael Grimm (R-NY-13) would give the U.S. Department of Transportation the power to decide if Tolls on federal-aid bridges and tunnels are “just and reasonable” and grants them to power to reduce tolls if deemed necessary.

Amendment 224 by Rep. Francisco Canseco (R-TX-23) amends 23 U.S.C. 129 preventing any federal funds from being used to approve new tolling on existing federal–?aid highways (excepting HOV lanes).  The amendment requires no net reduction of free lanes on any tolled road.

Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison is offering the same amendment (#1568) in the Senate.

In addition, Sen. Hutchison’s amendment would reduce to two the number of states permitted to apply to the Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Pilot Program.  As two states have already been approved, this amendment would effectively close the program.

A group of mostly state roadbuilders groups has formed a “US Tolling Coalition” to try break through US Government statutory bars to toll financing. The new organization went public today with a press release and the fireup of their website.

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Tolling Position

Tolling Position

Congress should allow states to use tolling in conjunction with other state or federal funds, creating a hybrid funding system. Currently, proposed toll facilities must demonstrate 100% toll revenue adequacy to potential bond holders on the new/upgraded facility. Few projects can meet that test without exorbitant tolls that will force diversions. With a hybrid system, toll revenue adequacy is much easier to demonstrate and will open the tolling option nationally.

Shift the statutory language from a project orientation to a system orientation. Allow states to toll all or any portion of the Interstate (all or single lanes), whether for new capacity, system preservation, or reconstruction.

Since this cycle is continuous, so must be the toll mechanism to pay for it.

  • States should try to avoid alternative tolled and non-tolled Interstate segments. All tolled segments will be allocated funding as needed over time.
  • Once the costs of electronic tolling have been incurred, it makes no sense to stop collecting tolls. Tolls should be adjusted up or down to meet planned Interstate needs.

Many states have expressed a growing interest in tolling as the introduction of more fuel-efficient vehicles has dramatically eroded the buying power of fuel tax revenues, which historically have represented their largest source of transportation funding.

The federal Highway Trust Fund has been able to meet the authorized funding levels contained in current surface transportation only through $35 billion in funding transfers from the general Treasury. The 18.4-cent federal gasoline tax has not changed since 1993 and there appears to be little appetite for increases in the upcoming reauthorization. Most states are projecting federal funding cuts of up to 35% under scenarios that would limit federal transportation investment to current revenues. If the federal government won’t help solve the large infrastructure problems most states face, it should at least provide states the tools they need to address the problems on their own.